Tag: Google

The History of the Hashtag, and how to use it effectively to brand your WordPress Website

The History of the Hashtag, and how to use it effectively to brand your WordPress Website

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It is more than just your phone’s pound key sign and it is not Twitter’s invention too. Today we discuss the history of the Hashtag, and how to use it effectively to brand your WordPress Website via Twitter, Facebook LinkedIn or Instagram. Who doesn’t know the famous hashtag? It is ever-present and has revolutionized professional media, it is used in events, reporting incidences, used in reference to movies and TV series and even used to set up meetings and hold very serious online conversations. Revolutions have used this #symbol to organize successful demos too. Build your first ever blog  20 minutes, 3 Simple Steps A hashtag is an indexing mechanism that groups a particular piece of content in the internet – or ‘tag’ it so it can be found by other users who are searching for that p
How To Solve Google “data-vocabulary.org schema deprecated” Error

How To Solve Google “data-vocabulary.org schema deprecated” Error

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Yesterday, Google announced that starting April 6, 2020 data-vocabulary.org schema deprecated thus it will no longer support data-vocabulary.org schema and a few hours later it began sending notifications via Google Search Console about this happening. If you are seeing such an error then its from Google. Google is thus going all in with Schema.org. The reason is that "with the increasing usage and popularity of schema.org the search engine giant decided to focus our development on a single SD scheme." How to fix the “Failed to Load Resource” error in WordPress Google will give SEOs, webmasters, site owners, WordPress plugin developers etc a few months window to transition from the regular data-vocabulary markup to schema.org markup.  Google also will be contacting any site owner who
How to Check and Improve the load Speed of Your Website

How to Check and Improve the load Speed of Your Website

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One of the most critical aspects of a website is its load speed time. This is what search engines check and becomes an important part of ranking your WordPress site up there. So apart from mobile friendliness, you need to work on the speed of your website. Therefore your website’s speed and performance is now more important today than ever before. Site visitor expectations have grown and their patience has decreased. This means that if your website loads too slowly, users could quickly move on to another site rather than waiting. Also even if your visitors users do not run necessarily away, a slow loading site will leave them not only disappointed, but frustrated, and likely to abandon your site later even in the midst of an only shopping spree. Here comes another ringer, Google!. Th
WordPress 5.3 to support Google’s UGC Nofollow attribute by default

WordPress 5.3 to support Google’s UGC Nofollow attribute by default

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WordPress 5.3 is slated for release on November 12, 2019, will bring about several updates. One of the biggest news is that WordPress announced that WordPress 5.3, will by default support Google’s UGC Nofollow attribute. This means that all links in the comments section would automatically use the UGC nofollow link attribute. UGC Nofollow Attribute Here is the explanation by Search Engine Journal about why this change is important for WordPress developers because it involves a change to the code. Here is how WordPress explains the change: “In WordPress 5.3, wp_rel_nofollow_callback() will be deprecated in favor of more generic callback function, wp_rel_callback(), which is now used to add other rel attribute values to a specified link. wp_rel_callback() is used by the exist
Search index bug: Google explains why your website lost traffic in April

Search index bug: Google explains why your website lost traffic in April

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In April, you might have noticed a drop in your search results. This is due to bug that temporarily lost part of the Search index. What does this mean? This had got nothing to do with your website breaking down or SEO done poorly. Basically Google was deploying a new version or the latest version of its Search index to all of its data centers across the world. AS this very routine process was happening, somewhere in the interwebs,  a "small number" of documents were "dropped" (or basically weren't included in the updated index), that means when the update was done, some content was not listed therefore ‘missing’ leading to Google Search delisting hundreds of websites. The result meant that for any affected websites there was lost traffic and subsequently revenue. Read How to use Jetp